Author Topic: use of DMM on motherboard  (Read 3839 times)

gowhar

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use of DMM on motherboard
« on: March 15, 2013, 07:49:26 AM »
i just want to know, how can i use digital multimeter to check each component on motherboard and also can i check the components using multimeters continuity test
thanks

dimlow

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Re: use of DMM on motherboard
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2013, 08:44:39 AM »
I assume you are talking about a PC motherboard ?

You can do some simple voltage checks and some more detailed checks of components. But a lot of components will need to be removed before they can be checked. You can only check some of the passive components like resistors and caps. Other components will be difficult or impossible to check without more advance equipment.

But really if your asking this question you do not have the skills to check and diagnose faults on a motherboard and you should stay away from it. If its a faulty board, the best thing to do is replace it. Some simple faults can be repaired, but in the end is it really worth the time and effort you put in ? The fault could be more economically fixed by swapping it out more often than not.

gowhar

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Re: use of DMM on motherboard
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2013, 10:35:40 AM »
I assume you are talking about a PC motherboard ?

You can do some simple voltage checks and some more detailed checks of components. But a lot of components will need to be removed before they can be checked. You can only check some of the passive components like resistors and caps. Other components will be difficult or impossible to check without more advance equipment.

But really if your asking this question you do not have the skills to check and diagnose faults on a motherboard and you should stay away from it. If its a faulty board, the best thing to do is replace it. Some simple faults can be repaired, but in the end is it really worth the time and effort you put in ? The fault could be more economically fixed by swapping it out more often than not.
I assume you are talking about a PC motherboard ?

You can do some simple voltage checks and some more detailed checks of components. But a lot of components will need to be removed before they can be checked. You can only check some of the passive components like resistors and caps. Other components will be difficult or impossible to check without more advance equipment.

But really if your asking this question you do not have the skills to check and diagnose faults on a motherboard and you should stay away from it. If its a faulty board, the best thing to do is replace it. Some simple faults can be repaired, but in the end is it really worth the time and effort you put in ? The fault could be more economically fixed by swapping it out more often than not.
thats ok but i want to know on what setting should i set on DMM and how to check simple voltages and passive components and also i shall be highly thankful if u paste any link of video showing how to use DMM to check the components of PC motherboard practically.
thanks
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 10:39:58 AM by gowhar »

Monkeh

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Re: use of DMM on motherboard
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2013, 10:46:46 AM »
The majority of components cannot be tested in-circuit and many cannot be tested with a normal multimeter.

You cannot simply diagnose a faulty motherboard and repair it by poking at it with a cheap multimeter.

classicmacintosh

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Re: use of DMM on motherboard
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2013, 01:17:06 PM »
As Monkeh said, you cannot diagnose a faulty board with a cheap meter.
I would also add that it would be extremely inadvisable to think about poking around anything you really care about or that would be expensive to replace if you are not absolutely confident with yourself - I've been tinkering for just shy of six years and still refuse to look at PC power supplies as I am not confident working on them. I'm not trying to discourage you as we all need to start somewhere but nobody here would want to see you damage a motherboard that for all we know could simply have faulty RAM or a bad power supply.
Finally, I'm not trying to be rude but just think that you should be careful as all it takes is one slip and the motherboard could be ruined.

Have fun,
-Ed