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Comment on "Arduino - What bits to start with...and a bit of head bashing!"

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Yttrium:
Hello everyone,

I really enjoyed this episode on Arduino and more particularly the philosophy of getting into Arduino.

Based on my personal experience with Arduino...

I agree with Martin that it is much more inspiring to have a personal goal, something to accomplish, to build, before starting experimenting with Arduino.  Even if this approach is a bit risky for lack of not knowing if the goal is attainable and to what degree, this personal goal will indeed provide the necessary "drive" to keep going through difficult moments when problems arise.

Thinking of something to accomplish without first figuring out all the tiny technical aspects of a project calls upon imagination and is one of the best ways to avoid restricting the project.  Anyway, once the project starts, adjustments are possible.

Also true, dividing the project into smaller tasks and then going back to the official examples, documentation and demos available to gain knowledge, makes the project more manageable and provides inspiring accomplishments.

Even though the approach Martin describes is the one I prefer, I agree and respect that there are many ways to discover Arduino.

Yttrium  :)

AB1BE:
Agreeing with Martin and Yttrium, I feel that having a small project with a specific goal is a great way to learn the new aspects of the hardware and software.

One quick project that people might try as a second Arduino application is to make an intervalometer to allow a camera to take a sequence of photos over time. The pictures can be later converted into a time-lapse video by the PC or Mac. There are a number of examples of this project, of varying complexity, on the web. At its simplest, it's just about a basic C program triggering the camera shutter - just like a remote shutter release.  A few external components needed include an opto isolator and the right plug for your camera.

For those looking for a bunch of ideas together with good info on programming and the needed hardware, I recommend this book - Arduino Cookbook (2nd Edition). It has a camera shutter control circuit. For more advanced users, there are details of how to interface with a plethora of Input and Output devices.

Once you can wire up an Arduino, check this book out! http://www.amazon.com/Arduino-Cookbook-Michael-Margolis/dp/1449313876/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1335633378&sr=8-1

MJLorton:

--- Quote from: AB1BE on April 28, 2012, 01:26:15 PM ---Agreeing with Martin and Yttrium, I feel that having a small project with a specific goal is a great way to learn the new aspects of the hardware and software.

One quick project that people might try as a second Arduino application is to make an intervalometer to allow a camera to take a sequence of photos over time. The pictures can be later converted into a time-lapse video by the PC or Mac. There are a number of examples of this project, of varying complexity, on the web. At its simplest, it's just about a basic C program triggering the camera shutter - just like a remote shutter release.  A few external components needed include an opto isolator and the right plug for your camera.

For those looking for a bunch of ideas together with good info on programming and the needed hardware, I recommend this book - Arduino Cookbook (2nd Edition). It has a camera shutter control circuit. For more advanced users, there are details of how to interface with a plethora of Input and Output devices.

Once you can wire up an Arduino, check this book out! http://www.amazon.com/Arduino-Cookbook-Michael-Margolis/dp/1449313876/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1335633378&sr=8-1

--- End quote ---

Thanks to both of you for the posts. Handy to know about that book....I had not come across it before.

Have a look at this gent's video...it is in Swedish (he says he'll do it again in English), is it the type of photographic device you were talking about?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0kzJqY7sS

Cheers,
Martin.

AB1BE:
That youtube link doesn't work for me. So here's some more info that can get people started building a DIY Intervalometer for time lapse photography. See this fascinating example of a time lapse movie taken with a still camera:
http://vimeo.com/15780202

Intervalometers can start very simply with just a timed shutter release function. Here are some examples of varying complexity:

General time lapse theory and simple breadboad version
http://openmoco.org/node/88

Minimalistic version with a pot to set the interval timing
http://www.flickr.com/photos/obeyken/sets/72157629190026584/

Arduino with 7 segment displays to show the timing
http://www.trevorshp.com/creations/intervalometer.htm

Once the basics are mastered, there's room for growing the intervalometer. Some people have extended the concept to complex systems that automatically control exposure and even do motion repositioning (Pan, tilt, tracking etc.) of the camera during the time lapse sequence! Others even have panoramic time lapse movies!
http://www.murphlab.com/2011/07/07/panoramic-time-lapse-movies/ 

Good Design and construction resource
For high speed photoraphy, there is a complete dedicated DIY system called the Camera Axe that also has many sensors to trigger flashes. It has a comprehensive and interesting web site. There's a lot of useful info there including connecting to different cameras. Worth reading
http://www.cameraaxe.com

As a wise man once said "Play, discover, learn and enjoy!"

Ken AB1BE

MJLorton:

--- Quote from: AB1BE on May 02, 2012, 10:28:49 AM ---That youtube link doesn't work for me. So here's some more info that can get people started building a DIY Intervalometer for time lapse photography. See this fascinating example of a time lapse movie taken with a still camera:
http://vimeo.com/15780202

Intervalometers can start very simply with just a timed shutter release function. Here are some examples of varying complexity:

General time lapse theory and simple breadboad version
http://openmoco.org/node/88

Minimalistic version with a pot to set the interval timing
http://www.flickr.com/photos/obeyken/sets/72157629190026584/

Arduino with 7 segment displays to show the timing
http://www.trevorshp.com/creations/intervalometer.htm

Once the basics are mastered, there's room for growing the intervalometer. Some people have extended the concept to complex systems that automatically control exposure and even do motion repositioning (Pan, tilt, tracking etc.) of the camera during the time lapse sequence! Others even have panoramic time lapse movies!
http://www.murphlab.com/2011/07/07/panoramic-time-lapse-movies/ 

Good Design and construction resource
For high speed photoraphy, there is a complete dedicated DIY system called the Camera Axe that also has many sensors to trigger flashes. It has a comprehensive and interesting web site. There's a lot of useful info there including connecting to different cameras. Worth reading
http://www.cameraaxe.com

As a wise man once said "Play, discover, learn and enjoy!"

Ken AB1BE

--- End quote ---

Ken....I took an hour out of my day to go through the links and all I can say is thank-you, thank-you, thank-you. What a brilliant set of links, particularly the first time lapse....but all of it is fascinating.
One fine day....when time allows...I'll play with a bit of this too.

Here is the link that failed...my mistake: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0kzJqY7sS4

Cheers,
Martin.

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