Author Topic: Measuring the Voltage of vegetables  (Read 2864 times)

bruno707

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Measuring the Voltage of vegetables
« on: June 24, 2014, 07:35:58 AM »
How would one go about that using a voltmeter???
cheers

SeanB

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Re: Measuring the Voltage of vegetables
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2014, 01:19:28 PM »
You would not really get anything meaningful. If you use dissimilar metals as the probes then you really have an electrochemical cell measuring the electropotential difference of the actual metal electrodes.

bruno707

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Re: Measuring the Voltage of vegetables
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2014, 12:45:26 AM »
I am asking the question because I have measured orange and apples and I get a reading of .258 Volts???
The numbers seem to be similar for a few different fruits.

So are you saying this is not the vegetables voltage but the actual metal electrodes??????

I am interested in Bio electricty .

So would it be possible to measure the voltage of Fruit and vegetables??????
If so how???

Thank You   Bruno

SeanB

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Re: Measuring the Voltage of vegetables
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2014, 02:22:16 PM »
Even with the same metal in each electrode you will get a voltage that depends on either differences in pH or in oxygen concentration only. Different pH will have a different electrochemical half cell voltage, and this also depends on the actual acid or base in that particular area, most of them being weak organic acids or bases. Different levels of diffused oxygen ( or hydrogen evolved in chemical reactions as well) also created electrochemical half cells that will be at different potentials.

You will never be able to measure voltage of a fruit or vegetable alone, it is the difference in electrochemical half cells ( measured with reference to a standard half cell which is a hydrogen gas in solution with a black platinum electrode, defined as 0V) of each side that is measured. You cannot easily separate the metal electrochemical cell from the solvent solution, as it varies with temperature, concentration and time and the current drawn as well.