Competitions and Giveaways > Competitions and Giveaways

Bryman BM257 Giveaway

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MJLorton:
Hi folks,

This is the meter that is up for grabs:
http://www.brymen.com.tw/product-html/cata250/BM250_Catalog.pdf
(The meter for this giveaway is a factory recondition unit...but it looks like new with leads etc.)

If you want to buy one (Franky's Store):
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Brymen-BM257-Digital-Multimeter-6000-count-Brand-New-Fluke-alternative-/200922627340

PLEASE READ conditions / requirements to enter to this giveaway:

1) You need to have been a registered member of this forum from June 2014 or before.
2) You need to have made 5 or more reasonable contributing posts. i.e. "Tell me what I need to solar power my home"...does not count.
3) I will have the final say / judgement on points 1 & 2 above.
4) This thread and competition will be closed / locked at the end of August 2014 when the draw will take place.

To be entered into this draw, simply post a link in this thread to a technology related story / article (electronics, solar, etc.) that has really taken your interest.

Thanks to the kind gent that made the meter available for the giveaway.

Cheers,
Martin.

birrbert:
Hello!

Good to be back! :)

I read this sometimes back in May and since then I'm following the development of organic material based rechargeable batteries.

Link: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/05/the-organic-carbon-battery-from-japan-that-could-spawn-the-next-tesla/362112/

Cheers!

mariush:
I'm not much of a poster in this forum, I've commented more on Youtube when I felt I had something to contribute. There's few posts here but i think there should be 5 or more decent ones.

One of the tech stories that got my interest is a recent one about the development of a porous silicone oxide material that's very suitable for RRAM, the next thing after flash, which is used now in SSDs, usb sticks, sd cards etc etc:  http://news.rice.edu/2014/07/10/rices-silicon-oxide-memories-catch-manufacturers-eye-2/


--- Quote ---Tour and colleagues began work on their breakthrough RRAM technology more than five years ago. The basic concept behind resistive memory devices is the insertion of a dielectric material — one that won’t normally conduct electricity — between two wires. When a sufficiently high voltage is applied across the wires, a narrow conduction path can be formed through the dielectric material.

The presence or absence of these conduction pathways can be used to represent the binary 1s and 0s of digital data. Research with a number of dielectric materials over the past decade has shown that such conduction pathways can be formed, broken and reformed thousands of times, which means RRAM can be used as the basis of rewritable random-access memory.

RRAM is under development worldwide and expected to supplant flash memory technology in the marketplace within a few years because it is faster than flash and can pack far more information into less space. For example, manufacturers have announced plans for RRAM prototype chips that will be capable of storing about one terabyte of data on a device the size of a postage stamp — more than 50 times the data density of current flash memory technology.

--- End quote ---

Also, what's cool about this material is that if i understand correctly it's much easier to build long 'sheets' of such memory cells and create chips of various sizes out of them and reduce the waste making everything more cheap:


--- Quote ---In the latest study, a team headed by lead author and Rice postdoctoral researcher Gunuk Wang showed that using a porous version of silicon oxide could dramatically improve Rice’s RRAM in several ways. First, the porous material reduced the forming voltage — the power needed to form conduction pathways — to less than two volts, a 13-fold improvement over the team’s previous best and a number that stacks up against competing RRAM technologies. In addition, the porous silicon oxide also allowed Tour’s team to eliminate the need for a “device edge structure.”

“That means we can take a sheet of porous silicon oxide and just drop down electrodes without having to fabricate edges,” Tour said. “When we made our initial announcement about silicon oxide in 2010, one of the first questions I got from industry was whether we could do this without fabricating edges. At the time we could not, but the change to porous silicon oxide finally allows us to do that.”

--- End quote ---

retiredcaps:
Hi Martin,

As you know, I'm really interested in multimeters and contribute, behind the scenes, at modemhead's website.

http://mrmodemhead.com/

edit: found this site on aug 23

http://emperoroftestequipment.weebly.com/

PS. Since April 2014, I have been busy switching from Windows XP to Linux so most of my efforts have been reading linux and its electronic related news at

http://lxer.com/

ProBang2:

Hello Martin,

some years ago I was registered in this forum as "ProBang" since november 2012. If you still have the postcards from the giveaway (Mastech 8218) I can prove it. That is why I´m hoping, the first and second requirement are fulfilled.

I don´t want to post a link to a specific article of interest. It would be quite randomly and the grade of my interest is changing over the time.
Instead, I´m posting a link to a site that holds my interest since years:

www.kfz-tech.de

It´s a german website about car-related technology. Switchable to an english version. A big knowledge-base. Very recommendable.

Greetings,

Hartmut

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